New Arrivals 27th to 3rd of July 2017

Coplan (D.) text & Gutiérrez (O.) photo. LAST NIGHT AT THE BASSLINE, a tribute
168pp., illus., paperback, Johannesburg, 2017. R280
Bassline was a performance space for live jazz in Johannesburg that opened in Melville, Johannesburg, in 1994, founded by Brad and Paige Holmes. During the nine years it was open a non-racial audience flocked to experience the live jazz performances of people like Louis Mhlanga, Gito Baloi, Abdullah Ebrahim, Johnny Fourie, George Piri, Hugh Masekela, Dorothy Masuka, Lulu Gontsana, Moses Molelekwa, and many others.

"In this creatively moving and well-crafted narrative of a society coming of age, David Coplan tells a story of a people who, through the music, the culture, the imagined future and all that jazz, defied the odds in their quest to break free from the cultural and racial barriers erected by a despot system...This is the story of a music venue that re-lived and repatriated the music of a people and social life long banished from the city back to a place where a community of cultural enthusiasts and activists gathered to unknowingly re-incarnate a cultural renaissance last experienced during the Sophiatown era " Sipho Sithole, from his foreword

David Coplan is also the author of "In Township Tonight! Three centuries of black city music and theatre" and "In the Time of Cannibals". He is Emeritus Professor and Chair of Anthropology at the University of the Witwatersrand.
Photographer and photojournalist Oscar Gutiérrez spent many hours at the Bassline photographing performancers.
Donker (M.), Truscott (R.). Minkley (G.) & Lalu (P.) eds. REMAINS OF THE SOCIAL, desiring the postapartheid
301pp., illus., paperback, Johannesburg, 2017. R350
This collection of essays, which "engages with what 'the social' might mean after apartheid", grew out of a collaboration between SARChI Chair in Social Change at the University of Fort Hare and the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape, that took the form of a Winter School for doctoral and master's students.

Contributions include:
"The Mandela Imaginary: reflections on post-reconciliation libidinal economy" by Derek Hook
"The Return of Empathy: postapartheid fellow feeling" by Ross Truscott
"Re-Cover: Afrikaans rock, apartheid's children and the work of the cover" by Aidan Erasmus
"The Graves of Dimbaza: temporal remains" by Gary Minkley and Helena Pohlandt-Mc Cormick
"The Trojan Horse and the 'Becoming' Technical of the Human'" by Premesh Lalu.

Maurits van Bever Donker and Ross Truscott are Andrew W Mellon Foundation Next Generation Researchers in the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape.
Gary Minkley is the NRF/ SARChI Chair in Social Change at the University of Fort Hare.
Premesh Lalu is Director of the DST-NRF Flagship for Critical Thought in African Humanities of the CHR at the University of the Western Cape.
Garisch (D.) ACCIDENT,
275pp., paperback, Cape Town, 2017. R250
"Dawn Garisch is boldly imaginative and thought provoking in this riveting account of a performance artist whose shocking acts challenge us to question important social issues. The novel is also a story of a mother and son relationship that walks the tightrope of when to hold on and when to let go." Kate Gottgens, artist

A novel about a mother's attempts to understand the self-harm her son, a performance artist, chooses to inflict on himself.

Medical doctor, author, and poet Dawn Garish is also the author of the novels, "Once, Two Islands" (2007) and "Trespass" (2009), a collection of poems, "Difficult Gifts (2011), and "Eloquent Body" (2012), a book about the relationship between our bodies and our creative selves. She also wrote a memoir, "Dance with Suitcase". In 2011 she won the Sol Plaatje European Union Poetry Award for her poem, "Miracle".
Heidenreich-Seleme (L.) & O'Toole (S.) eds. AFRICAN FUTURES, thinking about the future in word and image
343pp., colour illus., paperback, Bielefeld, 2016. R490
This publication documents and extends the enquiries of the multi-city African Futures festivals held in Johannesburg, Lagos and Nairobi, as well as related satellite events held in New York and São Paulo, in 2015. African Futures, a project of the Goethe-Institut South Africa, brings together artists, cultural activists and academics on the theme of the future, in the hope of building bridges between art, technology and intellectual discourse.

Contributions from South Africa include:
"Access to Ghosts" by Tegan Bristow
"Slipping" by Lauren Beukes
"Angazi, but am Sure" by Ntone Djabe
"Of Wastelands and Landfills" by Raimi Gbadamosi
"Influences of a Closet Chant" by Albert 'Ibokwe' Khoza
"Africa in the New Century" by Achille Mbembe
"My Aunt Nomaliso" by Chumisa Ndakisa
"Radical Sharing" by Thenjiwe Niki Nkosi
"Future Shock Lost" by Rowan Smith
"Leaping Out" by Pamela Phatsimo Sunstrum.

Lien Heidenreich-Seleme is head of cultural programmes sub-Saharan Africa at the Goethe-Institut South Africa.
Sean O'Toole is a journalist, art-critic, editor and writer based in Cape Town.
Kaschula (R.), Maseko (P.) & Wolff (H.) eds. MULTILINGUALISM AND INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION, a South African perspective
350pp., illus., paperback, Johannesburg, 2017. R380
A collection of essays that explores responses to the challenges of multilingualism, examine questions related to language planning and policy developmewnt and implementation, and analyse everyday language practice.

Contributions include:
"Language Empowerment and Intellectualisation through Multilingual Higher Education in South Africa" by Pamela Maseko and H Ekkehard Wolff
"Language nd Terminology Development in isiXhosa: a history" by Koliswa Moropa and Feziwe Shoba
"University Multilingualism: modelling rationales for language policies" by Bassey Antia
"The Development of Language Technologies in the South African Context" by Justus Roux
"Language Policy in South Africa through the Sapir-Whorf 'Looking Galsses'" by Russell Kaschula and Andre Mostert.

Russel Kaschula is Professor of African Language Studies and holds the NRF SARChI CHair in Intellectualisation of African Languages, Multilingualism and Education at Rhodes University.
Pamela Maseko is Associate Professor in African Language Studies at Rhodes University.
Sociolinguist H Ekkehard Wolff is based at the University of Leipzig.
Loxton (Q.) BEING KARI,
290pp., paperback, Cape Town, 2017. R240
A novel about a woman who, after discovering that her husband has been unfaithful, reconnects with her estranged family and returns to the neighbourhood where she grew up.

Qarnita Loxton was born in Cape Town in 1974. She has worked as an attorney and as an executive coach. "Being Kari" is her first novel.
Mathebula (M.) THE BACKROOM BOY, Andrew Mlangeni's story
218pp., paperback, Johannesburg, 2017. R320
Foreword by Kgalema Motlanthe.

Andrew Mlangeni was born in Soweto in 1925. He joined the Communist Party of South Africa and the ANC Youth League while still at school and in 1954 he joined the ANC. In 1961 he was selected as one of the first members to receive military training in China. In 1963 he was arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment at the Rivonia Trial. He spent 25 years on Robben Island. After his release he served as a member of parliament for the ANC from 1994 to 1999.

Mandla Mathebula is Chief Communications Director for the Ministry of Water and Environmental Affairs. He is also the author of "800 YEars of Tsonga History".
McLennan (D.), Sibul (H.) & Schoeman (C.) RUGBY AT ELLIS PARK, a history told through Test matches 1928-2016, including Test matches played at other venues on the Reef since 1896
220pp., 4to., b/w & colour illus., paperback, Cape Town, 2017. R640
Introduction by Francois Pienaar.

Recalls the Test matches played at Ellis Park and seeks to explain "why and how rugby grew with such vigour on the Highveld". from the preface

David McLennan is a dealer in rare books. His shop, Select Books, is located in Long Street just up from Clarke's. He has been an avid rugby fan and Newlands attendee since childhood. This is his second book, following on from "Rugby at Newlands".
Hymie Sibul contributed to "Rugby at Newlands" and has been a collector of rugby programmes and memorabilia most of his life.
Chris Schoeman has written several rugby books, including "Legends of the Ball" and "South Africa's Rugby Legends". He is a former editor of "SA Rugby" magazine and "The Who's Who of SA Rugby".
Rajab (K.) ed. A MAN OF AFRICA, the political thought of Happy Oppenheimer
217pp., b/w & colour illus., paperback, Cape Town, 2017. R250
Presents Harry Oppenheimer's views on liberalism, apartheid, socialism, sanctions, trade unions, education, geopolitics and the legacy of Cecil John Rhodes via extracts from his speeches and assessment by prominent South Africans such as Kgalema Motlanthe, Albie Sachs, Clem Sunter, Denis Beckett, Bobby Godsell, Jonathan Jansen and Xolela Mangcu.

Kalim Rajab has worked at Be Beers in London and as personal assistant to Nicky Oppenheimer, and is currently a director of strategy at the New National Assurance Company. He is also a trustee of the Helen Suzman Foundation, and writes for the Daily Maverick.
Strydom (F.) THE INSIDE-OUT MAN,
295pp., paperback, Cape Town, 2017. R230
A novel about a jazz pianist who is invited by a wealthy jazz lover to take part in a bizarre experiment.

"A surreal trip...it gave us weird dreams - in a good way." S.L. Grey

Fred Strydom is also the author of "The Raft". He lives in Johannesburg, where he works as a creative strategist and scriptwriter.
Twidle (H.) FIRE POOL, experiences in an abnormal world
288pp., paperback, Cape Town, 2017. R250
A collection of essays that chronicle South Africa in the 'second transition', a phase in which the foundations of the post-apartheid settlement are being challenged in different ways.

"Hedley Twidle's work is exquisitely crafted, clever, self-deprecating, and, above all, deeply thoughtful. We are lucky to have a writer of his calibre working on contemporary South African material." Jonny Steinberg, author of "A Man of Good Hope", "Three Letter Plague" and "The Number"

"Exhilerating! A book I will return to again and again, both for its uncommon insight, and the quiet beauty of its prose." Rebecca Davis, author of "Best White, and other anxious delusions"

Heldey Twidle is a writer, teacher and scholar based at the University of Cape Town. In 2012 he won the Bodley Head/ Financial Times Essay Competition for his piece, "Getting Pat Coetzee", included in this book.
Webster (E.), Britwum (A.) & Bhowmik (S.) eds. CROSSING THE DIVIDE, precarious work and the future of labour
260pp., paperback, Pietermaritzburg, 2017. R
This book is the outcome of a collaborative research project undertaken by researchers based in South Africa, Ghana and India. The first phase of the project resulted in the book, "Socio-economic Insecurity in Emerging Economies: building new spaces", edited by Khayaat Fakier and Ellen Ehmke (2014). This volume is the product of the second phase of the project. The contributing authors combine years of academic research with active involvement with grassroots organisations and partnered with major trade union movements in the three countries to prepare key chapters in the book: COSATU in South Africa, TUC in Ghana and LEARN and NTUI in India.

Contributions include:
"From Flexible Work to Mass Uprising: the Western Cape farm workers' struggle" by Jesse Wilderman
"Organising Farm Workers in Gauteng: economic upgrading and social downgrading" by uMbuso we Nkosi
"Sword of Justice or Defender of Vested Interest? the struggle of Johannesburg's municipal workers" by Edward Webster and Carmen Ludwig.

Edward Webster is Professor Emeritus in the Society, Work and Development Institute (SWOP) at the University of the Witwatersrand.
Akua Opokua Britwum is Associate Professor at the Centre for Gender Research, Advocacy and Documentation (CEGRAD) at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana.
Sharit Bhowmik was Professor and Chairperson of the Centre for Labour Studies at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences in Mumbai. He died in 2016.
Xaba (M.) & Martin (K.) eds. QUEER AFRICA 2, new stories
316pp., paperback, Johannesburg, 2017. R220
An anthology of 26 short stories that imagine what it means to be queer in Africa. The collection follows "Queer Africa: new and collected fiction" which won a Lambda Literary Award in 2014.

"Rendered here is an array of interpretations of what it means to be fully human, queer and African - three categories of identity often misconstrued as mutually exclusive. The stories collected in this volume give a kaleidiscopic peek into the many ways in which Africans inhabit 'queerness', giving fine grained texture to the lives and experiences of those whose humanity is routinely denied." Barbara Boswell, from her introduction

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