New Arrivals 21st to 27th of November 2017

Basson (A.) & du Toit (P.) ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE, how Jacob Zuma stole South Africa and how the people fought back
338pp., paperback, Johannesburg, 2017. R260
An Analysis of Jacob Zuma's misrule of South Africa.

"A remarkable, well-researched book, a must read for anyone interested in evidence of state capture and getting South Africa back on track." Thuli Madonsela, former Public Protector

Journalist and author Adriaan Basson is also the author of "Zuma Exposed" and "Finish & Klaar".
Journalist Pieter du Toit is currently editor of HuffPost South Africa.
de Graaff (B.) WARE MENSE,
158pp., colour illus., maps, hardback, d.w., First Afrikaans Language Edition, Pretoria, 2017. R250
Originally published in 2016 in Dutch as "Ik, Yzerbek". Translated by Daniel Hugo.

Bart de Graaff is a Dutch historian and journalist with an interest in South African politics and history. In 2015 and 2016 he travelled around southern Africa interviewing people, wanting to know more about the Khoi Khoi, the "original people". He tells some of their stories in his book.
Denis (P.) ed. FAITH AND MIGRATION, proceedings of the 2nd Dominican Study Week, Pietermaritzburg, 28-30 November 2016
247pp., paperback, Pietermaritzburg, 2017. R150
A collection of 24 papers presented at a conference on faith and migration organised by the Dominican Vice-Province of Southern Africa in 2016. While some speakers were academics, most were students for the ministry, priests, pastors and activists.

Contributions include:
"Immigration Crisis in South Africa: grappling with the colonial legacies" by Stanslaus Muyebe
"The Zionist Churches in Zimbabwe and Blessings for Illegal Immigrants: 'illegal but not sinful'" by Herbert Moyo
"The Concept of Multiculturalism in Liberal States: how far can we extend special rights to minority migrant groups?" by Edward Murambwa
"The Impact of Migration on Somalian Families in South Africa" by Wilbroad Mulenga
"Loving What Is: engaging with unaccompanied minors and young migrants living in Soweto" by Terry Sacco.
Joubert (E.) SPERTYD,
207pp., paperback, Cape Town, 2017. R275
Afrikaans writer Elsa Joubert reflects on the process of growing old. This book was written in her 95th year.

Elsa Joubert was born in 1922. In 1963 her first novel, "Ons wag op die kaptein", was awarded the Eugène Marais prize. "Die swerfjare van Poppie Nongena" (The Long Journey of Poppie Nongena) was awarded the WA Hofmeyer, CNA and Louis Luyt prizes. Her novel, "Die reise van Isobelle" (1995), was awarded the Hertzog Prize, and "Reisiger" (2011) won the University of Johannesburg Literary Prize, the Recht Malan Prize and the Louis Hiemstra Prize.
Kasrils (R.) A SIMPLE MAN, Kasrils and the Zuma enigma
283pp., b/w & colour illus., paperback, Johannesburg, 2017. R260
A memoir by Ronnie Kasrils in which he discusses his insights into the character of Jacob Zuma and how he understands the rapid unravelling of South Africa's post-apartheid transition.

Ronnie Kasrils was a commander in Umkhonto weSizwe from its inception in 1961 until 1990 and served in government from 1994 until he resigned in 2008. He lives in Johannesburg. He is also the author of "Armed and Dangerous" and "The Unlikely Secret Agent", which won the Alan Paton Award.
Procter (M.) & Zama (L.) CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE, the autobiography of Mike Proctor
239pp., b/w & colour illus., paperback, First SA Edition, Cape Town, 2017. R260
Former South African cricketer Michael Procter (born 1946) played very little international cricket because apartheid South Africa was banished from world cricket in the 1970s and 1980s. He was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1970 and South African cricketer of the year in 1967. Following his retirement, Procter was appointed as a match referee by ICC for officiating cricket matches.
Scholtz (L.) KRUISPAAIE, Afrikanerkeuses in die 19de en 20ste eeu
224pp., illus., paperback, Pretoria, 2016. R285
Examines the choices Afrikaners have made in the past and poses the question whether Afrikaners can create a future for themselves or whether they will disappear as a nation.

Historian Leopold Scholtz was born in 1948. Now retired, he was deputy editor of Die Burger newspaper and Media24's European correspondent. He was also Extraordinary Professor in History at the University of Stellenbosch.
South African Democracy Education Trust THE ROAD TO DEMOCRACY IN SOUTH AFRICA, volume 7: Soweto uprisings: new perspectives, commemorations and memorialisation
267pp., illus., map, hardback, Pretoria, 2017. R600
Volume 7 in The Road to Democracy Series is a special volume published on the 41st anniversary of the Soweto uprising, and is based on collective memories, eyewitness accounts, oral history testimonies and the views of veterans of the uprising.

Contributions include:
"Cultural imperialism, language and ideological struggles inside the Soweto classrooms" by Sifiso Mxolisi Ndlovu
"The 1976 Soweto Students' uprising and its Aftermath in Parts of the Northern Transvaal" by Sekibakiba Peter Lekgoathi
"'Angeke bemhlule umlungu. Umlungu unamandla, (They won't defeat the whites. Whites are powerful)': Students protest in Mzinoni township, Bethal, 1972-1977" by Tshepo Moloi
"June 16 1976 Soweto Uprisings: A journey into the contested world of commemoration" by Ali Khangela Hlongwane.
Suzman (J.) AFFLUENCE WITHOUT ABUNDANCE, the disappearing world of the Bushmen
297pp., b/w & colour illus., maps, hardback, d.w., New York. etc, 2017. R380
James Suzman explores the question of whether understanding how hunter-gatherers like the Bushmen found contentment by having few needs easily met, can help us address some of the environmental and economic challenges we face.

“'Affluence Without Abundance' may be the best book ever written about the San (Bushmen) - a people who lived for two hundred thousand years as successful hunter-garheres and are now transitioning to our more modern but less successful way of life. This book has truth on every page and is filled with important insights that range from hunting and tracking to how we think about time, money, value or success.” – Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, author of The Harmless People" and "The Old Way"

“An insightful and well-written book, describing the hard transition of foraging communities in Namibia from relative affluence during the Stone Age to contemporary poverty and misery. Avoiding both modern conceits and romantic fantasies, Suzman chronicles how economics and politics have finally conquered some of the last outposts of hunter-gatherers, and how much humankind can still learn from the disappearing way of life of the most marginalized communities on earth.” Yuval Noah Harari, author of Sapiens: a brief history of human kind" and "Homo Dues: a brief history of tomorrow"

“Suzman's descriptive prose and affection for his subjects generate the reader's genuine empathy…This fascinating glimpse into a disappearing way of life leads Suzman to reflect on our world today: a world where wealth and possessions are valued above all other pursuits. Suzman's account of the lives of Bushmen, past and present, offers plenty of fuel for thought.” Rachel Newcomb, The Washington Post

“To know what it is like to live as people lived for most of human history, you would have to find one of the places where traditional hunting-and-gathering practices are still alive…Fortunately for us, the anthropologist James Suzman did exactly that…The news here is that the lives of most of our progenitors were better than we think. We're flattering ourselves by believing that their existence was so grim and that our modern, civilized one is, by comparison, so great.” John Lancaster, The New Yorker

“This beautiful book--part memoir, part ethnography--offers a window into the lives of one of the most enduring of human cultures, the Khoisan hunters and gatherers of the Kalahari. If you have ever wondered how it might be to measure wealth not by material possessions but by the strength of social relations between people, read this book.” – Wade Davis, author of "The Wayfinders" and "Into the Silence"

Anthropologist James Suzman was awarded a Smuts Commonwealth Fellowship in African Studies at Cambridge University and led the De Beers Group's sustainability and public affairs initiatives. Recently he founded the think-tank Anthropos.
West (G.) THE STOLEN BIBLE, from tool of imperialism to African icon
626pp., paperback, Pietermaritzburg, 2016. R395
"'The Stolen Bible' emphasises African agency and distinguishes between African receptions of the Bible and African receptions of missionary-colonial Christianity. Through a series of detailed historical, geographical, and hermeneutical case-studies the book analyses Southern African receptions of the Bible, including the earliest African encounters with the Bible, the translation of the Bible into an African language, the appropriation of the Bible by African Independent Churches, the use of the Bible in the Black liberation struggle, and the ways in which the Bible is embodied in the lives of ordinary Africans." from the back cover

Gerald West is Professor of African Biblical Interpretation at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. His other books include "The Academy of the Poor: towards a dialogical reading of the Bible" and "Biblical Hermeneutics of Liberation: modes of reading the Bible in the South African context".
Wotshela (L.) FORT HARE, from garrison to bastion of learning, 1916-2016
134pp., oblong 4to., b/w & colour illus., maps, paperback, Johannesburg & Alice, 2017. R250
An illustrated centenary history of the University of Fort Hare. Includes profiles of 61 alumni and friends, including Tiyo Soga, ZK Matthews, Phyllis Ntantala, Ernest Mancoba, Govan Mbeki, Oliver Tambo, Nelson Mandela, Dennis Brutus, Seretse Khama, Robert Sobukwe, Can Themba, Lauretta Ngcobo, Chris Hani, Matthew Goniwe, and Pumla Gobodo-Mdikizela.

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