New Arrivals 14th to 20th of February 2019

Bolani (S.) WE ARE THE ONES WE NEED, the war on black professionals in corporate South Africa
291pp., paperback, Johannesburg, 2018. R250
Communications practitioner Sihle Bolani writes about her experience of race-related discrimination within several major South African corporations.

Foreword by Barbara Masekela.
Carpenter (N.) & Lawrance (B.) eds. AFRICANS IN EXILE, mobility, law and identity
337pp., illus., maps, paperback, Bloomington, 2018. R630
“Rather than a rare punishment inflicted on dissident elites, exile is revealed in this important volume as one of the defining features of African history since the colonial era. In their deeply researched and thematically linked essays, contributors present instances of exile from around the continent that illustrate the ambitions and limits of state power, extra-territorial strategies of resistance, and the capacity of relocation to spur both suffering and creativity. Africans in Exile masterfully enriches our understanding of two key themes in African history, mobility and community, and their salience for politics and individual experience over the past century and into the present.” Lisa Lindsay, author of Atlantic Bonds: A Nineteenth Century Odyssey from America to Africa

Contributions include:
"In the City of Waiting: education and Mozambican liberation exiles in Dar es Salaam" by Joanna Tague
"A Cold War Geography: South African anti-apartheid refuge and exile in London, 1945-1994" by Susan Pennybacker.

Nathan Carpenter directs the Center for Global Education at Northhampton Community College in Bethlehem, PA.
Benjamin Lawrance is Conable Endowed Chair of International and Global Studies in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at RIT in Rochester, NY.
Davis (S.) THE ANC'S WAR AGAINST APARTHEID, Umkhonto we Sizwe and the liberation of South Africa
268pp., illus. ,paperback, Bloomington, 2018. R630
Stephen Davis seeks to demonstrate that the history of Umkhonto we Sizwe is more complicated and ambiguous than previous accounts suggest and addresses efforts to consolidate a single narrative of struggle.

“This is an important and timely study, highly readable, solidly researched, and well written. It provides a fascinating and provocative engagement for those interested in histories of liberation, armed struggles, and informal armed formations.” Nicky Rousseau, University of the Western Cape

“Stephen Davis charts new territory in a bold and lively fashion. Apart from furthering our knowledge and understanding of MK, he contributes significantly to scholarship on liberation movements more broadly. Essential reading.” Gary Baines, author of South Africa's Border War

Stephen Davis is Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky.
Golomski (C.) FUNERAL CULTURE, AIDS, work and cultural change in an African kingdom
215pp., illus., map, paperback, Bloomington, 2018. R540
"Funeral Culture is an intimately observed portrait of changing burial rites in a country struggling under the burden of HIV. Golomski at once plunges into the rhythms of everyday life in Swaziland and gestures out toward broader questions about the work of kinship and death. Brimming with colorful characters and rich descriptions, written in welcoming and accessible prose: this is ethnography at its best. A marvelous accomplishment." Jason Hickel, author of Democracy and Death: the moral order of anti-liberal politics in South Africa

Casey Golomski is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of New Hampshire.
Hackman (M.) DESIRE WORK, ex-gay and Pentecostal masculinity in South Africa
198pp., paperback, Durham, 2018. R430
Melissa Hackman records the experiences of predominantly white Pentecostal men in post-apartheid Cape Town who turned to "ex-gay" ministries in the hope of “curing” their homosexuality in order to conform to "Christian" values and African social norms.

“One of Desire Work's great contributions is Melissa Hackman's ability to put a human face on the men who try but fail to convert to heterosexuality. I very much enjoy her personal touch in relating stories about her experiences and her subjects, and she has done an extraordinary job of eliciting extremely personal insights from her subjects, in some cases letting them hang themselves with their own words, and in others, allowing us to share their pain, confusion, and cruel optimism. I love this book.” Marc Epprecht, author of Sexuality and Social Justice in Africa: Rethinking Homophobia and Forging Resistance

Melissa Hackman is an independent scholar who has taught at Brown University and Emory University.
Hadfield (L.) LIBERATION AND DEVELOPMENT, Black Consciousness community programs in South Africa
255pp., illus., maps, paperback, East Lansing, 2016. R690
Explores Black Consciousness community development in the 1970s primarily through the history of the Black Community Programme organisation and its three major projects: the annual publication Black Review, the Zanempilo Community Health Centre in Zinyoka village and the Njwaxa Leather Home Industry factory, both in the apartheid homeland of Ciskei.

"Liberation and Development is a major achievement. Hadfield's study shows what Black Consciousness meant in the lives of the usually overlooked community development workers who knew it not as an abstract political philosophy but as the lived experience of social and personal development under apartheid. Hadfield's study is a vital intervention in the history of the struggle against apartheid, the social history of the 1970s, and the African origins of community development. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in understanding what Black Consciousness leaders like Steve Biko actually did during their all-too-short lives as activists. Based on comprehensive work with oral and written sources and rendered in sparkling prose, Liberation and Development announces exciting new directions in the historiography of twentieth-century South Africa." Daniel Magaziner, author of The Law and the Prophets: Black Consciousness in South Africa, 1968-1977

Leslie Hadfield is Assistant Professor of African history at Brigham Young University, USA.
Harrow (K.) AFRICAN FILMMAKING, five formations
301pp., paperback, East Lansing, 2017. R570
"Harrow has assembled an excellent volume detailing the histories of five cinema formations - Francophone African cinema, Anglophone West African cinema, Egyptian cinema, Maghrebian cinema, and South African cinema - from the Lumière brothers' screenings in Egypt in 1896 to the present moment. Informative and lucidly written, the chapters describe major changes in production and distribution practices and survey key films. This important book represents a valuable introduction to African cinema as well as an essential addition to the African film scholar's library." Carmela Garritano, Associate Professor of Africana Studies and Film Studies, Texas A&M University

Contributions include Film Production in South Africa: histories, practices, policies by Jacqueline Maingard.

Kenneth Harrow is Distinguished Professor of English at Michigan State University.
Kelly (J.) TO SWIM WITH CROCODILES, land, violence, and belonging in South Africa, 1800-1996
342pp., illus., maps, paperback, East Lansing, 2018. R860
"A compelling, fascinating account of African chiefs, their subjects, and how their concerns about land, security, belonging, and social reproduction made and remade shifting and dynamic political alliances from the nineteenth century through the end of apartheid. Through meticulous archival research and numerous oral accounts, Kelly highlights African agency and power, demolishes lingering mythologies of primordial 'tribal' Africans relentlessly victimized and manipulated by apartheid policies and 'third force' state-sponsored violence. In doing so, this book prompts us to rethink what we thought we knew about the ANC-IFP civil wars that very nearly derailed South Africa's democratic transition." Robert Trent Vinson, Frances L. and Edwin L. Cummings Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies, College of William and Mary

"To Swim with Crocodiles is a triumph on many levels. Kelly intervenes in local, regional, national, and continental history. Her deeply learned study offers critical insights into the ways in which local history in KwaZulu-Natal revealed the tangled politics of chiefship and white supremacy. Simultaneously, the book offers a rich and fluent understanding of the civil wars that marked the end of apartheid and develops theories on land and authority" Daniel Magaziner, Associate Professor of History, Yale University

Jill Kelly is Assistant Professor of African History at Southern Methodist University, USA.
Lengwiler (M.), Penn (N.) & Harries (P.) eds. SCIENCE, AFRICA AND EUROPE, processing information and creating knowledge
260pp., maps, hardback, London & New York, 2019. R550
Contributions include:
"Peter Kolb and the Circulation of knowledge about the Cape of Good Hope" by Nigel Penn and Adrien Delmas
"A Naturalist's Career: Hinrich Lichtenstein (1780-1857)" by Sandra Näf-Gloor
"'Nothing but love for natural history and my desire to help your Museum'? Ludwig Kreb's transcontinental collecting partnership with Hinrich Lichtenstein" by Patrick Grogan
"The African Travels of Hans Schinz: biological transfer and the academisation and popularisation of (African) Botany in Zurich" by Dag Henrichsen

Martin Lengwiler is Professor in the Department of History at the University of Basel, Switzerland.
Nigel Penn is Professor in the Department of Historical Studies at the University of Cape Town.
Patrick Harries was Professor of African History in the Department of History at the University of Basel, Switzerland.
Limb (P.) & Olaniyan (T.) eds. TAKING AFRICAN CARTOONS SERIOUSLY, politics, satire, and culture
259pp., illus., hardback, East Lansing, 2018. R860
Contributions include the essay, "South African Cartooning in the Post-Apartheid Era" by Andy Mason and Su Opperman, and interviews with Zapiro (Jonathan Shapiro, South Africa), Mabijo (Tebogo Motswetla, Botswana) and Dudley (Dudley Viall, Namibia).

Peter Limb is Emeritus Africana Bibliographer and Associate Professor in History and a Distinguished Faculty Member at Michigan State University.
Tejumola Olaniyan is Louise Durham Mead Professor of English and African Cultural Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Rossouw (H.) XAMISSA,
120pp., illus., paperback, New York, 2018. R430
A book-length poem that explores the history of Cape Town. "Xamissa adapts the mythical name for the springs and streams running from Table Mountain to the sea, under the city itself, before the colonial Dutch ships came" from the back cover

"Both poetry and the capacity to recover history's untold cruelties find a home in Xamissa, the name 'crossed out' beneath the one we know. 'Cape Town'. In Henk Rossouw's stunning collection of this name, crossed-out histories refuse their erasure, spill their liquid meaning, and reclaim the name that means' place of sweet waters'. But because what you see when you look at this place is too easy at first, you might miss that its bright surfaces are like 'a beautiful wet bag over the mouth of'. Xamissa misses nothing." Gabeba Baderoon, author of The Dream in the Next Body and The History of Intimacy


Henk Roussouw teaches at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
Wolmarans (J.) BOS,
391pp., paperback, Cape Town, 2019. R280
An Afrikaans thriller about two men who served together in Angola during the Border War. Years later, one of them works as a rhino poacher in Mozambique and the other is an operator tasked with finding him.

Freelance video producer, photographer and copywriter Jaco Wolmarans lives in Cape Town. This is his first novel.

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