New Arrivals 14th to 20th of March 2014

Boling (D.) THE UNDESIRABLES,
368 pp., paperback, London, 2014. R225
A novel about a young woman and her family imprisoned in a British concentration camp during the Anglo-Boer War by American journalist and author David Boling.
Boraine (A.) WHAT'S GONE WRONG?, on the brink of a failed state
166 pp., paperback, Johannesburg, 2014. R220
Alex Boraine examines the history of the ANC in an attempt to understand how, two decades after South Africa's first democratic elections, South Africa can be said to be a failing state. He concludes that the ANC's commitment to the party above all else lies at the root of the problem.

"At a time of much smoke and many mirrors, where better to turn for clarity and understanding than one of the rare voices of gravitas and credibility in South Africa today, political veteran Alex Boraine." Max du Preez

"This is a book that had to be written and Alex Boraine is the right person to write it." Desmond Tutu

Alex Boraine entered politics in 1974 and served as an MP for twelve years before resigning in 1986. Together with Frederick van Zyl Slabbert he founded Idasa. He was one of the main architects of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and was appointed by Nelson Mandela as deputy chairman. After teaching transitional justice at the New York University School of Law he became founding president of the International Center for Transitional Justice. He is the author of "A Country Unmasked" and "A Life in Transition".
de Lange (J.) STIL PUNT VAN DIE AARDE,
119 pp., paperback, Cape Town, 2014. R170
A new collection of poems by Afrikaans poet, short story writer and critic Johann de Lange.

Johann de Lange was born in 1959 in Pretoria. His first volume of poetry, "Akwarelle van die Dors", won the 1983 Ingrid Jonker Prize. His fourth volume, "Wordende Naak", was awarded the Rapport Prize for Poetry in 1990. His 2009 collection, "Die Algebra van Nood", won the 2011 Hertzog Prize for Poetry.
Koorts (L.) DF MALAN, and the rise of Afrikaner nationalism
466 pp., illus., paperback, Cape Town, 2014. R375
A biography of Dutch Reformed minister D.F.Malan, who led the National Party to victory in the 1948 elections in South Africa and who introduced the policy of "apartheid".

"An excellent, often spell-binding work that reveals the many dimensions of the man who dominated the Afrikaner nationalist movement." Hermann Giliomee, author of "The Afrikaners" and "The Last Afrikaner Leaders".

"...a history that is understanding but not apologetic, sympathetic but not justificatory." Jacob Dlamini, author of "Native Nostalgia" and co-author of "Categories of Persons" (with Megan Jones)

Also available in Afrikaans.

Lindie Koorts is a historian and postdoctoral fellow at the University of the Free State's Centre for Africa Studies.
McKaiser (E.) COULD I VOTE DA?, a voter's dilemma
196 pp., paperback, Johannesburg, 2014. R265
Political analyst Eusebius McKaiser explores the history and policies of the Democratic Alliance (DA), and why black voters are uncomfortable with the party.

Also available in Afrikaans.

Eusebius McKaiser is an associate at the Wits Centre for Ethics in Johannesburg. He is also the author of "A Bantu in My Bathroom".
Praeg (L.) A REPORT ON UBUNTU,
305 pp., paperback, Pietermaritzburg, 2014. R335
Leonard Praeg interrogates the concept of "Ubuntu", which he refers to as "African humanism".

“Fasten your seatbelts: an ultra-forceful, ultra-provocative and ultra-erudite mind is at work in this book – the journey is complicated and upstream, with a number of brilliant insights along the way.” — Albie Sachs, former Justice, Constitutional Court of South Africa

“This is a necessary, important and unprecedented philosophical intervention into a debate that, for all the political posturing, has shown itself unable to think the politics of Ubuntu. Praeg’s text redresses that lack by interrogating, it would seem, every element, every possible contingency, every possible variegation, of the term. He is relentless in pursuit of rescuing Ubuntu from inanity and political nonsense and, moreover, instilling in it an intellectual integrity.” — Grant Farred, Professor of Africana Studies, Cornell University

Leonard Praeg is Associate Professor in the Department of Political and International Studies at Rhodes University.
Rademeyer (P.) THE VIEW,
60 pp., paperback, Cape Town, 2013. R190
A play set in a future when earth is ruined and all homosexual people have been shipped off into space.

"What 'The View" gets right, to devastating effect, is in how the ultimate effect of prejudice is isolation, not only for the victims but for the perpetrators too. It is the story of the total destruction of our social existence" David Fick, Broadway World

Playwright and director Philip Rademeyer co-founded the Cape Town-based theatre collective, Rust Co-Operative, with Penelope Youngleson in 2012. He won the Oscar Wilde Award for Best New Writing for "The View" at the 2013 Dublin Gay Theatre Festival, where the play also won the Doric Wilson Intercultural Dialogue Award.
Röhrs (S.), Smythe (D.), Hsieh (A.) & de Souza (M.) eds. IN SEARCH OF EQUALITY, women, law and society in Africa
252 pp., paperback, Cape Town, 2014. R320
A collection of essays on women's rights in seven African countries: South Africa, Namibia, Malawi, Uganda, Nigeria, Rwanda and Côte d’Ivoire.

Contributions include:
"Challenges in litigation on gender issues in Namibia" by Dianne Hubbard
"Gender Equality in Customary Marriages in South Africa" by Mikateko Joyce Maluleke
"Ending Impunity for Hate Crimes Against Black Lesbians in South Africa" by Wendy Isaak.
Sanders (P.) 'THROWING DOWN WHITE MAN", Cape rule and misrule in colonial Lesotho, 1871-1884
306 pp., map, illus., paperback, Morija, 2010. R275
A history of Lesotho under the rule of the Cape Colony. Peter Sanders focuses especially on the Gun War of 1880/81, from which the Basotho emerged undefeated. This war led to the end of Cape rule, the re-establishment of British rule, and the triumph of paramountcy.
van der Waal (K.) ed. WINELANDS, WEALTH AND WORK, transformations in the Dwars River Valley, Stellenbosch
247 pp., b/w & colour illus., paperback, Pietermaritzburg, 2014. R330
A study on how the people of the Dwars River Valley between Stellenbosch and Franschhoek in the Cape winelands are responding to real estate development and social transformation processes post 1994.

Contributions include:
"No Place Like Home: the complexities of resettlement and development at Lanquedoc" by Francois Louw
"Solms-Delta: transformation or neopaternalism?" by Paula Jackson
"Boschendal: politicisation or transformation?" by Corrine Cash and Larry Swatuk
"Women as 'Dorp Supporters': new opportunities for female entrepreneurship" by Ingrid van der Heijden
"Patrolling Respectability with the Neigbourhood Watch" by Tinashe Pfigu, Cassandra Gabriel and Kees van der Waal
"Pentecostalism in the Dwars River Valley: challenging the mission legacy" by Handri Walters and Miemie de Plessis.

Kees van der Waal is Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Stellenbosch.
van Graan (M.) RAINBOW SCARS,
81 pp., paperback, Cape Town, 2013. R250
A play that explores identity and inter-racial relationships in contemporary South Africa. This play was first performed at Artscape Theatre in Cape Town in 2013.

Mike van Graan was born in 1959 in Cape Town, where he lives. From 1988-1991 he was the Theatre Coordinator of the Community Arts Project (CAP) and, subsequently, its Director. He has also held the positions of General Secretary of the National Arts Coalition, Director of the Bartel Arts Trust (BAT) in Durban, and Special Adviser on arts and culture to the Minister of Arts, Science and Technology. In 1996 he launched Article 27 Arts and Culture Consultants. His other plays include "The Dogs Must be Crazy", "Bafana Republic", "Elusive Spring" and "Brothers in Blood".

"One of the few practicing contemporary South African playwrights able to construct morally complex and dramatically layered scripts dealing with highly controversial socio-political topics." Brent Meersman, Mail & Guardian
Wicomb (Z.) OCTOBER,
270 pp., hardback, d.w., Cape Town, 2014. R240
A novel about a women's return to her family and the small Namaqualand town where she grew up, after years of living abroad.

Zoë Wicomb is Emeritus Professor at the Strathclyde University in Glasgow, where she lives. She is also the author of "You Can't Get Lost in Cape Town", a collection of linked stories, two novels, "David's Story" and "Playing in the Light" and the collection of short stories, "The One That Got Away". In 2013 she was awarded Yale University's Windham Campbell Prize for fiction

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