New Arrivals 24th to 30th of July 2016

Bassett (C.) & Clarke (M.) eds. POSTCOLONIAL STRUGGLES FOR A DEMOCRATIC SOUTH AFRICA, legacies of liberation
120pp., hardback, London & New York, 2016. R770
Contributions include:
"Culture and Resistance in Swaziland" by Teresa Debly
"From Liberation Movement to Party Machine? The ANC in South Africa" by Roger Southall
"Geologies of Power: blood diamonds, security politics and Zimbabwe's troubled transition" by Richard Saunders.

Carolyn Bassett is Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of New Brunswick, Canada.
Marlea Clarke is Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Victoria, Canada, and a Research Associate with Labour and Enterprise Research Project (LEP), University of Cape Town.
Comaroff (J.) & (J.) THEORY FROM THE SOUTH, how Euro-America is evolving toward Africa
222pp., paperback, First SA Edition, Stellenbosch, 2014. R410
First published in the USA in 2011.

Jean and John Comaroff explore how we might understand and explain democracy, law, national borders, labour and capital, religion and the occult, liberalism and multiculturalism, and several other issues, with theory developed in the Global South.

John Comaroff is currently the Hugh K. Foster Professor of African and African American Studies and of Anthropology at Harvard University, where he is also Oppenheimer Research Fellow in African Studies. He is also an Affiliated Research Professor at the American Bar Foundation and Honorary Professor of Anthropology at the University of Cape Town.
Jean Comaroff is currently the Alfred North Whitehead Professor of African and African American Studies and of Anthropology at Harvard University. She is also Honorary Professor of Anthropology at the University of Cape Town.
Doyle (L.) et al (eds.) THE GREAT SOUTH AFRICAN COOKBOOK,
369pp., 4to., colour illus., hardback, Cape Town, 2016. R450
Sixty-seven top South African chefs, cooks and food artisans were asked to contribute recipes for the food they would cook for someone they loved. Contributors include Luke Dale-Roberts, Ina Paarman, Dorah Sitole, Siphokazi Mdlankomo, Cass Abrahams, Kobus van der Merwe, Liesl van der Walt, Xoliswa Ndoyiya and Zayaan Khan.

All proceeds from the sale of the book will go to the Nelson Mandela Foundation to develop and support community food and agricultural projects.

Fataar (A.) ENGAGING SCHOOLING SUBJECTIVITIES ACROSS POST-APARTHEID URBAN SPACES,
185pp., paperback, Stellenbosch, 2015. R380
"One of the few educational sociologists in South Africa working with ethnographic methods, Fataar captures the complex interactions and dynamics between social life, school processes and youth subjectivity in townships in the Western Cape. Its approach to the troubled question of youth and subjectivity is enlightening, and vital to understanding the post-apartheid city and school. Insightfully wrought, the book fills a much-needed gap in educational sociology in South Africa." Linda Chisholm, Professor, Centre for Education Rights and Transformation, University of Johannesburg

"Aslam Fataar's work with concepts of mobilities and space is enormously generative, providing a way for teachers, principals, communities and policy makers to engage with the ‘complex ecologies’ of young people’s learning in urban schools. As an astute policy analyst, he also well knows the systemic barriers in the way of achieving this...This is an exciting and provocative book. It pushes an important conversation about the next phase of education in South Africa and takes the global conversation about pedagogical injustice to new dimensions." Professor Marie Brennan and Dr Lew Zipin, Victoria University, Melbourne

Aslam Fataar is the Vice-Dean: Research in the Faculty of Education at Stellenbosch University. He is President of the South African Education Research Association, and Editor-in-Chief of the Southern African Review of Education. He is also the author of "Education Policy Development in South Africa's Democratic Transition, 1994-1997" (2011).
Herrington (N.) THE IRISH BOER WOMAN,
282pp., illus., paperback, Durban, 2016. R240
The second novel in the Brigid O'Meara trilogy, about a young Irish woman who sympathises with the Boer struggle during the Anglo-Boer War and is incarcerated in a British concentration camp. The first volume in the trilogy, "England Wants Your Gold", was published in 2015.
Ilbury (C.) & (D.) A FOX'S TALE, insights from one of Africa's most creative strategic thinkers
190pp., illus., paperback, Cape Town, 2016. R230
Foreword by Clem Sunter.

Business author, scenario strategist and facilitator Chantelle Ilbury writes about her early days as an educator and entrepreneur, her business partnership with Clem Sunter, and her experience steering the executive-level strategies of global organisations and business leaders. She also offers her perspectives on working in Africa, and on women in the corporate environment.

Chantelle Ilbury's other books, co-authored with Clem Sunter, are "The Mind of a Fox", "Games Foxes Play", and "Socrates and the Fox".

Kibinde (V.) BENEATH THE BLACK SUN OF CABINDA, a novel
127pp., paperback, First English Language Edition, Stellenbosch, 2015. R250
First published in French in 2004 under the title "Au Soleil Noir du Cabinda". Translated into English by Vanessa Everson.

A novel set in Cabinda, an Angolan enclave surrounded by the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, at the time it was engaged in a violent struggle to secure its independence.

Virginie Kibinde was born in 1966 at Pointe-Noire in Congo-Brazzaville where her family had fled to escape the bloodshed in Cabinda. She studied literature and language in Brazzaville and in Grenoble. Currently she lives in France, near Grenoble.
Newton (L.) KAROO MOOSE, [play]
63pp., illus., paperback, London, 2009. R335
A play about a young girl who has a life-changing encounter with an escaped moose. Set in a remote and impoverished village in the Karoo, South Africa.

"a contemporary story which has the poignancy and punch to become one of our theatre classics" Pretoria News

Lara Foot Newton was born and grew up in Pretoria. In 2005 she relocated from Johannesburg to Cape Town to take up the position of Resident Director and Dramaturg at the Baxter Theatre. In 2010 she was appointed CEO and Director of the theatre. She was Resident Director of The Market Theatre from 1996 to 1998 and Associate Artistic Director from 1998 to 2000. In 2004, she won the Rolex International Theatre award and worked in London with director Sir Peter Hall for a year. She has won many awards, including the Fleur du Cap Award for Outstanding Young Director (1992), National Vita Award (shared with Athol Fugard) for Best Director (1994), Standard Bank Young Artist of the Year Award (1995) and Fleur du Cap Award for Best New South African Play for "Tshepang" (2003) and Naledi Awards for Best New Play and Best New Production for "Karoo Moose" (2007).

Newton (L.) TSHEPANG, the third restament
56pp., paperback, Reprint, London, ((2005) 2011. R295
A play inspired by the rape in 2001 of a nine month-old baby, Tshepang.

Lara Foot Newton was born and grew up in Pretoria. In 2005 she relocated from Johannesburg to Cape Town to take up the position of Resident Director and Dramaturg at the Baxter Theatre. In 2010 she was appointed CEO and Director of the theatre. She was Resident Director of The Market Theatre from 1996 to 1998 and Associate Artistic Director from 1998 to 2000. In 2004, she won the Rolex International Theatre award and worked in London with director Sir Peter Hall for a year. She has won many awards, including the Fleur du Cap Award for Outstanding Young Director (1992), National Vita Award (shared with Athol Fugard) for Best Director (1994), Standard Bank Young Artist of the Year Award (1995) and Fleur du Cap Award for Best New South African Play for "Tshepang" (2003) and Naledi Awards for Best New Play and Best New Production for "Karoo Moose" (2007).
Sanders (M.) LEARNING ZULU, a secret history of language in South Africa
198pp., paperback, First SA Edition, Johannesburg, 2016. R350
First published in the USA in 2016.

Mark Sanders places his own efforts to learn the Zulu language within a wider context, examining the motives behind the development of Zulu-language learning. He looks at the white appropriation of Zulu language, music, and dance in South African culture, at the association of Zulu with a martial masculinity and with what is most properly and powerfully African. He also explores differences in English- and Zulu-language press coverage of Jacob Zuma's trial for rape, and the role of linguistic purism in xenophobic violence.

"Ostensibly about one man's quest to acquire a language, 'Learning Zulu' is a clever, surprising, and enlightening journey into 150 years of South African history. Nobody has written quite this subtly about race and language in South Africa in a long while." Jonny Steinberg, University of Oxford

"'Learning Zulu' is a brilliant book. Unprecedented in the South African arena and very likely beyond, Sanders's ‘secret history' is nothing less than a sustained tour de force and an extraordinary mix of linguistics, literary criticism, cultural studies, legal studies, psychoanalytic theory, and autobiography/memoir. This is very much a book about the psychic and psychopolitical investments involved in acquiring and teaching language in colonial and postcolonial settings." Stephen Clingman, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Mark Sanders in Professor of Comparative Literature at New York University. His books include "Complicities: the intellectual and apartheid" and "Ambiguities of Witnessing: law and literature in the time of a truth commission".

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