New Arrivals 24th to 30th of January 2018

Badri (B.) & Tripp (A.) eds. WOMEN'S ACTIVISM IN AFRICA, struggles for rights and representation
250pp., paperback, London, 2017. R450
A collection of essays by authors who are part of women's activist groups in contemporary Africa.

Contributions include:
"Women's Organising for Liberation in South Africa" by Sheila Meintjies
"African Influences on Global Women's Rights: an overview" by Aili Mari Tripp and Balghis Badri.

"This compact volume on women's activism, by many of the most outstanding scholars in the field, is among the best and most useful I have seen. The editors, bolstered by excellent contributions, turn conventional wisdom about African women on its head." Sondra Hale, UCLA (Emerita)

Aili Mari Tripp is Professor of Political Science and Evjue Bascom Professor of Gender and Women's Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA.
Balghis Badri is Professor of Social Anthropology and Director of the Regional Institute for Gender, Diversity, Peace and Rights at Afhad University for Women, Sudan.
Bernstein (R.) MEMORY AGAINST FORGETTING, memoir of a time in South African politics, 1938-1964
359pp., illus., paperback, Second Edition, Johannesburg, (1999) 2017. R380
Originally published in 1999. This second edition includes new forewords by Thabo Mbeki, Former President of South Africa, and Rivonia Trial attorney Joel Joffe.

Lionel 'Rusty' Bernstein (1920-2002) was arrested at Liliesleaf Farm in 1963 and tried for sabotage alongside Nelson Mandela, Walter Sisulu, Govan Mbeki and other leaders of the ANC and it's armed wing, Umkhonto we Sizwe. He was acquitted in June 1964, but was immediately rearrested and charged with being a member of the Communist Party. Released on bail, he fled into exile in England.
Chisholm (L.) BETWEEN WORLDS, German missionaries and the transition from mission to Bantu Education in South Africa
265pp., illus., maps, paperback, Johannesburg, 2017. R380
"In "Between Worlds Linda Chisholm meticulously and with great sensitivity dissects how one mission society, the German Hermannsburg Mission Society, parleyed its decision to remain within the state system in the shift from mission to Bantu Education, in creative and important ways. The book is a detailed portrait of the Hermannsburg Mission’s education work, but also a critical and insightful commentary on a set of broader questions, reflecting off the current political moment in South Africa." Professor Natasha Erlank, Historical Studies, University of Johannesburg

"Linda Chisholm’s account of German Lutheran missionaries’ school and teacher education work in South Africa disrupts conventional understandings of the role of missionaries in the development of South Africa’s education system. Drawing on extensive archival research in South Africa and Germany, the history of the largely ignored Hermannsburg Mission reveals the ambiguities and contradictions which marked their complex relationships with local communities and the colonial and apartheid state." Volker Wedekind, School of Education, University of Nottingham

Linda Chisholm is Professor in the Centre for Education Rights and Transformation at the University of Johannesburg. Her other books include "Changing Class: education and social change in post-apartheid South Africa"
Cleveland (T.) FOLLOWING THE BALL, the migration of African soccer players across the Portuguese colonial empire, 1949-1975
266pp., illus., map, paperback, Athens, 2017. R595
Todd Cleveland "examines the experiences of African football players from Portugal's African colonies as they relocated to the metropole from the late 1940s until the conclusion of the colonial era in 1975." from the back cover

"The great impact this book will have is not only to look at colonialism through soccer and the experiences of African players in various Portuguese colonial contexts, but - more significantly - to refocus discussions of colonialism and cultural practices on the local and colonized," Roger Kittleson, author of "The Country of Football: soccer and the making of modern Brazil"

"Cleveland guides the reader not only to follow the journeys of these men but, through his analysis of their movements, to gain new awareness of the historical conditions that characterized the places of departure and the places of arrival." Nuno Domingos, author of "Football and Colonialism: body and popular culture in urban Mozambique"

Todd Cleveland is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Arkansas. He is also the author of "Stones of Contention" and "Diamonds in the Rough".
Coetzee (J.M.) THREE STORIES,
71pp., hardback, Melbourne, 2014. R250
This collection includes:
"A House in Spain", first published in "Architectural Digest 57/10", 2000
"Nietverloren", first published as "The African Experience" in "Preservation 54/2", 2002
"He and His Man", delivered as the Nobel Lecture, 2003.
Durrant (R.) dir. KROTOA,
117 minutes, DVD, , 2017. R350
A controversial feature film based on a life of Krotoa (known as Eva to the Dutch and English settlers) was the niece of Autshumao, a Khoi leader. She was removed from her tribe to serve Commander Jan van Riebeeck at the first fort established by the Dutch East India Company at the Cape of Good Hope in the mid-17th century. She assimilated the Dutch language and culture and became an influential interpreter and mediator but struggled to find a middle way between her Goringhaicona tribe and the van Riebeeck household.

The film won Best Film at the Harlem International Film Festival, a Platinum Award at the International Movie Awards, a Diamond Award at the Filmmakers World Festival, a Best of Show Award at the The IndieFEST Film Awards, and a World Platinum Award at the World Woman Awards.
Hirson (B.) YOURS FOR THE UNION, class and community struggles in South Africa, with a new foreword by Tom Lodge
230pp., illus., map, paperback, New Edition, London, (1990) 2017. R450
A reprint of Baruch Hirson's history of the making of the black working class in South Africa from 1930-47, first published in 1990.

Barush Hirson (1921-1999) was an activist who was imprisoned as a result of his opposition to the apartheid regime. On his release in 1975 he went into exile in the UK, where he taught at several universities. His other books include "Year of Fire, Year of Ash", "The Cape Town Intellectuals" and his autobiography, "Revolutions in My Life".
Tom Lodge is Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Limerick, Ireland. He is the author of "Mandela, a critical life" and "Politics in South Africa: from Mandela to Mbeki".
Meintjies (L.) text & Lemon (TJ.) photo. DUST OF THE ZULU, Ngoma aesthetics after apartheid
338pp., illus., map, paperback, Durham & London, 2017. R495
"Louise Meintjes traces the political and aesthetic significance of ngoma, a competitive form of dance and music that emerged out of the legacies of colonialism and apartheid in South Africa. Contextualizing ngoma within South Africa's history of violence, migrant labor, the HIV epidemic, and the world music market, Meintjes follows a community ngoma team and its professional subgroup during the twenty years after apartheid's end." from the back cover

Includes over one hundred photographs of ngoma performances, the majority taken by photojournalist TJ Lemon.

"'Dust of the Zulu' is hands-down among the very best ethnographic works ever written on the politics of aesthetics. Commanding, rewarding, challenging, and shattering in turns, equally gorgeous and unflinching in its evocations, it is above all poignant and virtuosic in its performance of criticism and compassion. This is a hugely important book for South African history and aesthetics, for anthropologies of the body and voice, for cultural studies of music, sound, and dance, and for experimental ethnographic writing and imaging. A stunning book." Steven Feld, author of "Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra: five musical years in Ghana"

"Louise Meintjies brilliantly salvages Zulu dancers from the demeaning, colonialist stereotypes of sweating, bellicose, and largely anonymous men. Readers who have long been frustrated by the dearth of serious studies of African dance will welcome her comprehensive theoretical grasp, analytical rigor, and sheer intellectual potency. A terrific work that will have a lasting impact, 'Dust of the Zulu' will reinvigorate dance and performance studies everywhere. Meintjies makes South African studies proud." Veit Erlmann, author of "Music, Modernity, and the Global Imagination: South Africa and the west"

Louise Meintjes is Associate Professor of Music and Cultural Anthropology at Duke University and the author of "Sound of Africa! Making music Zulu in a South African Studio".
Photojournalist TJ Lemon is based in Johannesburg.
Naidu (S.) & le Roux (E.) A SURVEY OF SOUTH AFRICAN CRIME FICTION, critical analysis and publishing history
200pp., paperback, Pietermaritzburg, 2017. R350
An overview of South African crime fiction that places the genre within its wider social and historical context. Includes a detailed bibliography of crime fiction since the 1890s.

"This survey is a milestone in the study of African crime fiction in general and of the South African variety in particular. Naidu and le Roux not only look at some of the usual suspects of literary investigations in the field - genre, gender and ideology - but also at ecocritical aspects, forgotten precursors, and the decisive role of publishing, along with the inception, packaging and censorship of such fiction. This book is a treasure trove for seasoned crime fiction sleuths and novice amateur detectives alike; it also includes a bibliography that will provide ample clues for further studies." Christine Matzke, co-editor of "Postcolonial Postmortems" and "Life is a Thriller"

Sam Naidu is Associate Professor in the Department of English at Rhodes University.
Elizabeth le Roux is Associate Professor and co-ordinator of Publishing Studies in the Department of Information at the University of Pretoria. She is also the author of "A Social History of the University Presses in Apartheid South Africa".
Soske (J.) INTERNAL FRONTIERS, African nationalism and the Indian diaspora in twentieth-century South Africa
342pp., paperback, First SA Edition, Johannesburg, 2017. R650
First published in the USA in 2017.

A history of the anti-apartheid struggle in which Jon Soske "places India and the Indian diaspora at the centre of the African National Congress's development of an inclusive philosophy of nationalism." from the back cover

"Ambitious and rivetingly intelligent, 'Internal Frontiers' offers a decolonized model of global history. Located at the intersection of South Africa's anti-apartheid struggle with the idea of India, the book rescripts notions of race, empire, nation, diaspora, and much more. Exquisitely written with exceptional interdisciplinary depth, it will become a model of intellectual history." Isabel Hofmeyr, author of "Gandhi's Printing Press, experiments in slow reading"

“This paradigm-shifting book locates a radical strain of South African nationalism in the political firmament of postwar Durban. Deeply researched and beautifully written, 'Internal Frontiers' reveals how insurgent intellectuals such as Anton Lembede and Albert Luthuli, influenced by India’s independence movement and the challenges of building solidarity with Natal’s Indian diaspora, conceived a vision of the nation ‘from below’ that affirmed African agency while also embracing a diverse, multiethnic political community.” Robin Kelley, author of "Freedom Dreams: the black radical imagination"

“Soske’s combination of ‘high’ political narrative with material histories of class, race and sexuality is indispensable. This book is an extremely important counter to sentimental ideas about social and political relations between Africans and people of South Asian descent in South Africa during turbulent times.” Antoinette Burton, author of "The Trouble with Empire"

Jon Soske is Assistant Professor of History at McGill University and Research Associate at the Centre for Indian Studies in Africa, University of the Witwatersrand. He has co-edited three books, "One Hundred Years of the ANC: debating liberation histories today", "Apartheid Israel: the politics of an analogy", and "Ties That Bind: race and the politics of friendship in South Africa".
Vahed (G.) AHMED DEEDAT, the man and his mission
288pp., illus., paperback, Durban, 2013. R285
Ahmed Hoosen Deedat (1918 – 2005) was a South African writer and public speaker of Indian descent. A Muslim missionary, he held inter-religious public debates with evangelical Christians, as well as video lectures on Islam, Christianity, and the Bible. He also established an international Islamic missionary organisation, IPCI, and wrote several booklets on Islam and Christianity.

"As provocative as he may have been, 'Shaikh' Ahmed Deedat gave dignity to millions of Muslims worldwide. In their minds, 'Shaikh' Deedat confronted the white man and prompted the most powerful nations to remember that Islam, misunderstood and marginalised by most Christian theologians, still had a voice." Shafiq Morton, "Muslim Views", South Africa

Goolam Vahed is Associate Professor in the Department of Historical Studies at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. His other books include "Blacks in Whites: sporting struggles in KwaZulu-Natal" "Inside Indian Indenture: a South African story, 1860-1914" and "Mahatma Gandhi in South Africa, 1893-1914".

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